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Digital survey to find ‘fossil’ stars

Star field

Federal Government funding will boost Australian astronomical research, including the search for the oldest stars in the galaxy.

THE FIRST DIGITAL IMAGING SURVEY of the southern night sky will be developed thanks to funding from the Federal Government.

Announcing funding for 106 projects, Innovation Minister Senator Kim Carr said that investing in research was vital for the development of new ideas, the creation of jobs and a better quality of life for all Australians.

Dome of the SkyMapper telescope

The work will use the ANU's SkyMapper telescope at Siding Spring Observatory.

Researchers at the Australian National University, working with Australia’s newest Nobel Laureate, Professor Brian Schmidt, will use a $390,000 grant to image one billion stars and galaxies in the Southern Sky Survey, underpinning science programs of international prominence such as the search for the oldest stars in the galaxy.

The Southern Sky Survey will be the first digital imaging survey of the entire southern hemisphere sky. The information resulting from a billion stellar and galaxy images will underpin a number of significant national science programs of international prominence. These include the discovery of the oldest stars in our galaxy, fossils from its formation. Chief investigator for the newly-funded project is ANU Professor Gary S. Da Costa.

Adapted from information issued by the office of the Innovation Minister and ANU. Images courtesy ANU and Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI/NASA/ESA).

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Galaxies are running out of gas

A star-forming region

Compared to earlier cosmic epochs, galaxies these days are running of out of the gas raw material with which to make new stars. (Hubble Space Telescope image.)

THE UNIVERSE FORMS FEWER STARS than it used to, and a CSIRO study has now shown why—compared to the past, galaxies today have less gas from which to make stars.

Dr Robert Braun (CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science) and his colleagues used CSIRO’s Mopra radio telescope near Coonabarabran, NSW, to study far-off galaxies and compare them with nearby ones.

Light (and radio waves) from the distant galaxies takes time to travel to us, so we see the galaxies as they were between three and five billion years ago.

Galaxies at that stage of the Universe’s life appear to contain considerably more molecular hydrogen gas than comparable galaxies in today’s Universe, the research team found.

Stars form from clouds of molecular hydrogen. The less molecular hydrogen there is, the fewer stars will form.

The research team’s paper is in press in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

Raw material for stars

Astronomers have known for at least 15 years that the rate of star formation peaked when the Universe was only a few billion years old and has declined steeply ever since.

“Our result helps us understand why the lights are going out,” Dr Braun said. “Star formation has used up most of the available molecular hydrogen gas.”

Mopra radio telescope

CSIRO's Mopra radio telescope near Coonabarabran in New South Wales.

After stars form, they shed gas during various stages of their lives, or in dramatic events such as explosions (supernovae). This returns some gas to space to contribute to further star formation.

“But most of the original gas—about 70%—remains locked up, having been turned into things such as white dwarfs, neutron stars and planets,” Dr Braun said.

“So the molecular gas is used up over time. We find that the decline in the molecular gas is similar to the pattern of decline in star formation, although during the time interval that we have studied, it is declining even more rapidly.”

Dark energy the demon

Ultimately, the real problem is the rate at which galaxies are “refuelled” from outside.

Gas falls into galaxies from the space between galaxies, the intergalactic medium. Two-thirds of the gas in the universe is still found in the intergalactic medium—the space between the galaxies—and only one third has already been consumed by previous star formation in galaxies, astronomers think.

“The drop-off in both gas availability and star formation seems to have started around the time that Dark Energy took control of the Universe,” Dr Braun said.

Up until that time, gravity dominated the Universe, so the gas was naturally pulled in to galaxies, but then the effect of Dark Energy took over and the Universe started expanding faster and faster.

This accelerating expansion has probably made it increasingly difficult for galaxies to capture the additional gas they need to fuel future generations of star formation, Dr Braun speculates.

Adapted from information issued by CSIRO; NASA, ESA, STScI/AURA.

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