One image, five moons

Five of Saturn's moons in one image

Five of Saturn's moons appear in this single image taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

NASA’s CASSINI SPACECRAFT snapped this image showing part of Saturn’s rings edge-on, and with five of the giant planet’s moons in the same frame.

The moon Rhea (1,528 kilometres in diameter) dominates the image, and is in the foreground of the tableau. Below it and appearing to sit on the rings, is Dione (1,123km wide). Dione is actually far in the background.

Just to the right of Dione is what looks like a small bump in the rings. This is actually Prometheus (86km wide), a “shepherd moon” that orbits Saturn along the inner edge of the F ring.

The tiny dot off to the right of the rings is Epimetheus (113km wide), and the larger moon right on the edge of the image is Tethys (1,062km wide). Epimetheus is very interesting, as it shares almost exactly the same orbit as another moon, Janus. In fact, their orbits are different by a factor of only 50 kilometres. And every now and then they come close together and swap positions!

Cassini was about 61,000 kilometres from Rhea when it took this image on January 11, 2011. Detail can be seen on Rhea down to about 2km per pixel.

Just so that you know what each of the moons looks like close up, here are images of them, also taken by Cassini.

Saturn's moon Rhea.

Saturn's moon Rhea.

Saturn's moon Dione.

Saturn's moon Dione.

Saturn's moon Prometheus.

Saturn's moon Prometheus.

Saturn's moon Epimetheus.

Saturn's moon Epimetheus.

Saturn's moon Tethys.

Saturn's moon Tethys.

Adapted from information issued by NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute.

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