Stellar fireworks

A Hubble image of NGC 3603

NGC 3603 is a collection of stars surrounded by gas and dust, 20,000 light-years from Earth.

Looking like a  fireworks display, this young, glittering collection of stars  is surrounded by clouds of interstellar gas and dust—a nebula—the raw material for new stars.

The nebula is located 20,000 light-years away in the constellation Carina; the central cluster of huge, hot stars is called NGC 3603.

This environment is not as peaceful as it looks. Ultraviolet radiation and violent stellar winds have blown out an enormous cavity in the gas and dust enveloping the cluster, providing an unobstructed view of the cluster.

Most of the stars in the cluster were born around the same time but differ in size, mass, temperature, and colour. The course of a star’s life is determined by its mass, so a cluster of a given age will contain stars in various stages of their lives, giving an opportunity for detailed analyses of stellar life cycles.

NGC 3603 also contains some of the most massive stars known. These huge stars live fast and die young, burning through their hydrogen fuel quickly and ultimately ending their lives in supernova explosions.

Star clusters like NGC 3603 provide important clues to understanding the origin of massive star formation in the early, distant universe.

Astronomers also use massive clusters to study distant starbursts that occur when galaxies collide, igniting a flurry of star formation.

The proximity of NGC 3603 makes it an excellent lab for studying such distant and momentous events.

See the full-size image here (new window).

Adapted from information issued by STScI. Image credit: NASA, ESA, R. O’Connell (University of Virginia), F. Paresce (National Institute for Astrophysics, Bologna, Italy), E. Young (Universities Space Research Association/Ames Research Center), the WFC3 Science Oversight Committee, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA).

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