Lunar eclipse Saturday night

Partial lunar eclipse

The June 26 partial lunar eclipse will see just over half the Moon's diameter covered by the Earth's shadow at the point of maximum eclipse, 9:19pm Australian eastern standard time.

  • Partial lunar eclipse, Saturday, June 26
  • Half the Moon will be covered at mid-eclipse
  • Easy to see; you don’t need a telescope

Australian stargazers will be treated to a partial lunar eclipse on Saturday, June 26.

All of Australia will see it, weather permitting (although in WA the eclipse will already be underway by the time the Moon rises over the eastern horizon).

An eclipse of the Moon happens when the Sun, Earth and Moon line up, with the Earth in the middle, and the Earth’s shadow is cast onto the Moon.

If the Moon goes right through the middle of Earth’s shadow, there is a total eclipse.

If it “cuts the corner” of the shadow, there is a partial eclipse, which is what we’ll get on Saturday.

The main eclipse action will be from 8:17pm to 11:00pm, Australian eastern standard time (AEST). (Do the usual time adjustments if you live in a different time zone.)

Lunar eclipses are perfectly safe to watch (unlike solar eclipses), but they happen quite slowly. The best bet is to go outside and check on it every 15-20 minutes. And you don’t need a telescope to view, just use your unaided eyes.

Generally, there are two lunar eclipses and two solar eclipses each year, but they’re not always visible from the same places each time. For any particular location, there is usually one lunar eclipse each year, with a solar eclipse every 2-3 years.

What will we see on Saturday night?

There are two parts to Earth’s shadow: a not-so-dark outer part (the penumbra), and a darker inner part (the umbra).

The Moon will start going into the penumbra at 6:55pm AEST, but it won’t be very noticeable.

It will enter the umbra around 8:17pm AEST, by which time a small, dark “bite” will seem to have been taken out of it. Mid-eclipse will occur at 9:38pm AEST, with about half the Moon’s diameter in shadow. Then the stages will work in reverse, with the Moon leaving the darker part of the shadow at 11:00pm AEST.

Future eclipses

Australian stargazers will just catch the end of a total lunar eclipse in December this year, and the end of another one in June 2011.

There’ll be a solar eclipse in July this year, but Australians won’t see it. However, we’ll get a full view of the total lunar eclipse in December 2011.

The next big total solar eclipse visible from Australia will be seen from Cape York in November 2012.

· Partial lunar eclipse, Saturday, June 26

· Half the Moon will be covered at mid-eclipse

· Easy to see; you don’t need a telescope

Australian stargazers will be treated to a partial lunar eclipse on Saturday, June 26.

All of Australia will see it, weather permitting (although in WA the eclipse will already be underway by the time the Moon rises over the eastern horizon).

An eclipse of the Moon happens when the Sun, Earth and Moon line up, with the Earth in the middle, and the Earth’s shadow is cast onto the Moon.

If the Moon goes right through the middle of Earth’s shadow, there is a total eclipse.

If it “cuts the corner” of the shadow, there is a partial eclipse, which is what we’ll get on Saturday.

The main eclipse action will be from 8:17pm to 11:00pm, Australian eastern standard time (AEST). (Do the usual time adjustments if you live in a different time zone.)

Lunar eclipses are perfectly safe to watch (unlike solar eclipses), but they happen quite slowly. The best bet is to go outside and check on it every 15-20 minutes. And you don’t need a telescope to view, just use your unaided eyes.

Generally, there are two lunar eclipses and two solar eclipses each year, but they’re not always visible from the same places each time. For any particular location, there is usually one lunar eclipse each year, with a solar eclipse every 2-3 years.

What will we see on Saturday night?

There are two parts to Earth’s shadow: a not-so-dark outer part (the penumbra), and a darker inner part (the umbra).

The Moon will start going into the penumbra at 6:55pm AEST, but it won’t be very noticeable.

It will enter the umbra around 8:17pm AEST, by which time a small, dark “bite” will seem to have been taken out of it. Mid-eclipse will occur at 9:38pm AEST, with about half the Moon’s diameter in shadow. Then the stages will work in reverse, with the Moon leaving the darker part of the shadow at 11:00pm AEST.

Future eclipses

Australian stargazers will just catch the end of a total lunar eclipse in December this year, and the end of another one in June 2011.

There’ll be a solar eclipse in July this year, but Australians won’t see it. However, we’ll get a full view of the total lunar eclipse in December 2011.

The next big total solar eclipse visible from Australia will be seen from Cape York in November 2012.

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  1. admin says:

    I’m glad you got to see some of it, Kim.
    Cheers,
    Jonathan

  2. Kim says:

    Cloud cover in Brisbane last night – so could only see bits. Quite specy though – thanks for the notice about it.

  3. admin says:

    Gemma, most of Australia — but not Kalgoorlie unfortunately — will catch the end of a total lunar eclipse in December this year: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/December_2010_lunar_eclipse
    Most of Australia will catch the beginning of a total lunar eclipse in June next year; some parts of WA will see it all: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/June_2011_lunar_eclipse
    And all of Australia will see a total lunar eclipse in December 2011: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/December_2011_lunar_eclipse
    Cheers,
    Jonathan

  4. admin says:

    It certainly was great Dionysia. It’s easy to see why the ancients would have been freaked out by it, but our modern knowledge doesn’t diminish the wonder.
    Cheers,
    Jonathan

  5. Dionysia says:

    Absolutley INCREDIBLE!!!! LOVED IT!!! Mother Nature really shows us what magic is xxx

  6. gemma says:

    omg. i missed it. dam. hope there will be another one in kal

  7. admin says:

    Crystal clear night in Sydney too, Sally. Glad you’re enjoying the view. 🙂

  8. Sally says:

    Thanks for the info :o] Beautiful clear night here in Tassie and it looks great.