Planetary line-up this week

Diagram of a planetary line-up May 19-22.

Diagram of the planetary line-up May 19-22, as seen from the perspective of an observer in the United States.

  • Moon, two planets & star line up
  • Happens from May 19-22
  • Easy to see – don’t need a telescope

The bright star Regulus joins the Moon and the planet Mars to form a beautiful lineup high in the southern sky (for US observers; in the northern sky for S. Hemisphere observers) at nightfall May 19-22, according to the editors of the University of Texas’ StarDate magazine.

And the best part of this stargazing spectacle is that you won’t need a telescope or binoculars to enjoy it. All you need is your eyes and a clear sky!

Starting on May 19, Mars will be in good view above the Moon as night falls. Regulus shines to the left of Mars, slightly higher. Regulus is the brightest star of Leo, the lion, and is more massive, hotter, and brighter than the Sun. Mars looks like a bright orange star.

On May 20, Regulus will be a little to the upper right of the first-quarter Moon, with bright orange Mars farther to the Moon’s right. The trio will form a wide, skinny triangle. They will be high in the sky at nightfall, and drop from view by around 2:00am

On May 21, the Moon will lie between Saturn (due south) and Mars (in the southwest) at nightfall. Saturn looks like a bright golden star.

By May 22, the Moon shines below Saturn, high in the south at sunset.

Adapted from information issued by StarDate magazine.

Moon, two planets & star line up

Happens from May 19-22

Easy to see – don’t need a telescope

The bright star Regulus joins the Moon and the planet Mars to form a beautiful lineup high in the southern sky (for US observers; in the northern sky for S. Hemisphere observers) at nightfall May 19-22, according to the editors of the University of Texas’ StarDate magazine.

And the best part of this stargazing spectacle is that you won’t need a telescope or binoculars to enjoy it. All you need is your eyes and a clear sky!

Starting on May 19, Mars will be in good view above the Moon as night falls. Regulus shines to the left of Mars, slightly higher. Regulus is the brightest star of Leo, the lion, and is more massive, hotter, and brighter than the Sun. Mars looks like a bright orange star.

On May 20, Regulus will be a little to the upper right of the first-quarter Moon, with bright orange Mars farther to the Moon’s right. The trio will form a wide, skinny triangle. They will be high in the sky at nightfall, and drop from view by around 2:00am

On May 21, the Moon will lie between Saturn (due south) and Mars (in the southwest) at nightfall. Saturn looks like a bright golden star.

By May 22, the Moon shines below Saturn, high in the south at sunset.

Adapted from information issued by StarDate magazine.

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